How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.

IMO anything about is fab who agrees?

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

Some parts of the real estate lending landscape are getting competitive. "This is a world that is awash in capital," said Ethan Penner, Calabasas, Calif.

Remote working enables more Americans to move to cheaper areas

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://realtybiznews.com/remote-working-enables-more-americans-to-move-to-cheaper-areas/98757871/

Americans who move to new areas are finding that they’re being given more opportunities to telecommute as employers try to convince them to remain in their jobs.

That’s according to a new Redfin study, which found that telecommuting is enabling many Americans to relocate to areas with more affordable housing while keeping the same salary.

“The
job market is very tight and employers want to hold on to people, so
companies are much more willing now to allow workers to move,” said
Daryl Fairweather, Redfin’s chief economist. “Plus, technology
has enabled employers to let staff work remotely in a cost-efficient
and productive manner.”

Redfin’s
survey covered 272 U.S. residents, and found that more than half of
them either sometimes or always work remotely since moving in the
past year. About one in seven said they wouldn’t have been able to
move if they weren’t allowed to telecommute.

The
study indicates that the growth of remote work has enabled far more
people to move to areas with more affordable housing. It found that
areas such as San Francisco, Los Angeles and Seattle were the most
commonly moved-away from, with the most popular destinations being
Phoenix; Sacramento, California; and Portland, Oregon.

Younger
respondents tended to have more opportunities to work remotely,
according to the survey. Of those aged 38 or younger, 55.5% said they
work remotely sometimes or always following their move. Of those
who’re aged 39 and above, just 49% said the same thing.

The post Remote working enables more Americans to move to cheaper areas appeared first on RealtyBizNews: Real Estate News.

best super fan !

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

Some parts of the real estate lending landscape are getting competitive. "This is a world that is awash in capital," said Ethan Penner, Calabasas, Calif.

How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.

anyone else love this post as much as me

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

Real estate transactions for Dec. 8 through Dec. 14, 2019. TOMPKINS COUNTY. Ithaca City. Four Thirty, Llc sold 430-444 State St W to Arnot Ithaca 2, …

Remote working enables more Americans to move to cheaper areas

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://realtybiznews.com/remote-working-enables-more-americans-to-move-to-cheaper-areas/98757871/

Americans who move to new areas are finding that they’re being given more opportunities to telecommute as employers try to convince them to remain in their jobs.

That’s according to a new Redfin study, which found that telecommuting is enabling many Americans to relocate to areas with more affordable housing while keeping the same salary.

“The
job market is very tight and employers want to hold on to people, so
companies are much more willing now to allow workers to move,” said
Daryl Fairweather, Redfin’s chief economist. “Plus, technology
has enabled employers to let staff work remotely in a cost-efficient
and productive manner.”

Redfin’s
survey covered 272 U.S. residents, and found that more than half of
them either sometimes or always work remotely since moving in the
past year. About one in seven said they wouldn’t have been able to
move if they weren’t allowed to telecommute.

The
study indicates that the growth of remote work has enabled far more
people to move to areas with more affordable housing. It found that
areas such as San Francisco, Los Angeles and Seattle were the most
commonly moved-away from, with the most popular destinations being
Phoenix; Sacramento, California; and Portland, Oregon.

Younger
respondents tended to have more opportunities to work remotely,
according to the survey. Of those aged 38 or younger, 55.5% said they
work remotely sometimes or always following their move. Of those
who’re aged 39 and above, just 49% said the same thing.

The post Remote working enables more Americans to move to cheaper areas appeared first on RealtyBizNews: Real Estate News.

Ohio RE/MAX Agent Monika DeRoussel Joins eXp Realty

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

Ohio RE/MAX Agent Monika DeRoussel Joins eXp Realty

https://realtybiznews.com/ohio-re-max-agent-monika-deroussel-joins-exp-realty/98757910/

Monika DeRoussel today announced that she has joined eXp Realty, one of the fastest-growing, global real estate companies. DeRoussel joins eXp Realty from RE/MAX, one of the leading global real estate franchisors, where she was named the No. 1 individual real estate agent in Southern Ohio, 2011-2018, and in 2019 was ranked as one of the top 100 individual real estate agents in the United States. DeRoussel joins the company’s more than 26,000 real estate agents across North America, the United Kingdom and Australia, with the goal of taking her Ohio-based business global.

Monika DeRoussel

“I am excited to join the global brokerage of eXp Realty after more than a decade as a local Ohio real estate agent with RE/MAX,” said DeRoussel. “As an immigrant from Czechoslovakia and a former competitive athlete, I am very proud of my success in Ohio’s real estate industry but I have been eager to expand further and work on a global level. By joining eXp Realty, I will be able to take my business to the next level thanks to eXp’s global resources which will allow me to build a partnership of agents from across the country.”

DeRoussel is a real estate professional renowned for her friendly and enthusiastic demeanor. Awarded her real estate license in 2006, her professional management experience ensured her business swiftly doubled in size, becoming RE/MAX’s top-performing agent in Southern Ohio from 2011 through 2018 and on their Top 100 agents list.

eXp Realty was founded in 2009 as the first cloud-based brokerage firm. Innovating the real estate brokerage space, eXp Realty moves real estate to an anytime and anywhere service through internet technology. eXp Realty had exceeded 26,000 real estate agents in the U.S. and Canada and recently expanded into Australia and the United Kingdom. The growth is due to the company’s core values, international professional collaboration, and other high-tech solutions and tools, including a virtual office.

For more information about Monika DeRoussel, visit Facebook and LinkedIn.

For more information about eXp Realty, visit exprealty.com.

Monika DeRoussel is an independent contractor of eXp Realty and this is not an official release of eXp Realty, its parent eXp World Holdings, Inc. or any related subsidiary.

The post Ohio RE/MAX Agent Monika DeRoussel Joins eXp Realty appeared first on RealtyBizNews: Real Estate News.

loving the fanpage

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

loving the   fanpage

8 Tips To Make Your Listing Picture Perfect

Buyers get their first impression of a home from property photos, so stage for the shoot.

How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.