How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.

Amazing post I <3

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

Traditional ranch style meets mid-century modern right in the heart of Ridglea. The home at 4504 Ridgehaven Road is a one-level 4,727 square foot …

Remote working enables more Americans to move to cheaper areas

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://realtybiznews.com/remote-working-enables-more-americans-to-move-to-cheaper-areas/98757871/

Americans who move to new areas are finding that they’re being given more opportunities to telecommute as employers try to convince them to remain in their jobs.

That’s according to a new Redfin study, which found that telecommuting is enabling many Americans to relocate to areas with more affordable housing while keeping the same salary.

“The
job market is very tight and employers want to hold on to people, so
companies are much more willing now to allow workers to move,” said
Daryl Fairweather, Redfin’s chief economist. “Plus, technology
has enabled employers to let staff work remotely in a cost-efficient
and productive manner.”

Redfin’s
survey covered 272 U.S. residents, and found that more than half of
them either sometimes or always work remotely since moving in the
past year. About one in seven said they wouldn’t have been able to
move if they weren’t allowed to telecommute.

The
study indicates that the growth of remote work has enabled far more
people to move to areas with more affordable housing. It found that
areas such as San Francisco, Los Angeles and Seattle were the most
commonly moved-away from, with the most popular destinations being
Phoenix; Sacramento, California; and Portland, Oregon.

Younger
respondents tended to have more opportunities to work remotely,
according to the survey. Of those aged 38 or younger, 55.5% said they
work remotely sometimes or always following their move. Of those
who’re aged 39 and above, just 49% said the same thing.

The post Remote working enables more Americans to move to cheaper areas appeared first on RealtyBizNews: Real Estate News.

How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.

Thanks for the info big fan here

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

Traditional ranch style meets mid-century modern right in the heart of Ridglea. The home at 4504 Ridgehaven Road is a one-level 4,727 square foot …

5 Tips for Selling Your Luxury Home Without Reducing the Asking Price

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://realtybiznews.com/5-tips-for-selling-your-luxury-home-without-reducing-the-asking-price/98757898/

While no one wants to sell a their home for less than their asking price, being forced to accept a lower offer on a luxury home often constitutes a significant financial loss. From understanding the mindset of potential buyers to choosing the right time to sell, there are plenty of tips that may help to ensure a successful sale.

Focusing on a Smaller Pool of Buyers

The higher price range means having to content with a smaller pool of prospective buyers. Marketing efforts that lack focus and promotional efforts that are too broad in their reach or scope often produce lackluster results. Focusing your efforts on those buyers who possess the right lifestyle and who have the means to afford a luxury home can make quite a difference.

Assessing Current Market Trends

While having to content with fluctuating market conditions is something that ever seller has to contend with, trying to get a good price for a luxury home during a downturn in the market can be all but impossible. Keeping tabs on market trends and choosing the right time to sell or list your property are never matters that should be left to chance.

Using the Right Realtor

Promoting, showing and marketing luxury homes often requires a different approach than would be needed for other residential properties. Dealing with a realtor who may lack the skills, experience and other resources needed to find a buyer could result in lengthy delays or leave you with no other option but to reduce your asking price.

Quality Promotional Content

Promotional media and other marketing materials that fail to play up the exclusive nature of a luxury home could end being little more than a liability. Ensuring that all photos, videos and other media used to market a home are of the highest quality possible is not something that should go overlooked.

Social-Media Marketing Tactics

Social media has been a real game changer in terms of marketing and advertising. Failing to properly utilize such a powerful tool could make finding a buyer far more complicated. Online promotional efforts and an effective social-media marketing strategy can be key assets in terms of your ability to maximize the sale price of a property.

Having to sell for less than you might like is a situation you would do well to avoid. The right resources, sales tactics and other helpful tips that can aid you in your search to find a buyer could end up playing a key role in your efforts. Devising a more effective marketing strategy can go a long way towards ensuring a successful sale.

The post 5 Tips for Selling Your Luxury Home Without Reducing the Asking Price appeared first on RealtyBizNews: Real Estate News.

I think posts about real estate are fab who agrees?

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

I think  posts about real estate are fab who agrees?

8 Tips To Make Your Listing Picture Perfect

Buyers get their first impression of a home from property photos, so stage for the shoot.

How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.

How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.

posts like this are why I love social media

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

Traditional ranch style meets mid-century modern right in the heart of Ridglea. The home at 4504 Ridgehaven Road is a one-level 4,727 square foot …