3 Must-Read Tips for Flipping Houses

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

3 Must-Read Tips for Flipping Houses

https://realtybiznews.com/3-must-read-tips-for-flipping-houses/98757865/

House flipping is all the rage right now. It seems like every time you turn on the TV, there’s a different show about house flipping on. Since it’s become so popular, many average joes have taken on the task. However, a lot of people have gotten in over their heads after tackling a job of this magnitude. Read these tips for flipping houses if you’re in the market for a fixer-upper. If you follow this advice, you may make a huge profit, and you can start a lucrative business of your own.

Hire Trusted Professionals

An essential tip for flipping houses is to hire a trusted team of professionals. House flippers must realize they can’t do everything on their own, so it’s critical to hire experts that can help you tackle the projects ahead. Please, don’t hire the first contractor you find on the internet. There are so many horror stories of people getting ripped off by their contractors.

Be inquisitive when you’re speaking to handymen you’re looking to hire. Know what questions to ask a roofing contractor before you give them the job. Ask to see examples of their previous work, as well. Also, call their references and make sure they check out. That way, you can make sure you’re working with a team that’ll complete things correctly.

Stick to the Budget

It seems nearly impossible to stick to a budget during a home renovation project; this sentiment is especially true for house flippers. It’s so important to have a number in mind before you begin flipping a house. If you don’t budget properly, finances will quickly spin out of control.

Don’t splurge on extravagant design items. Remember, you won’t live in the home. Yes, you want it to look nice, but there’s no reason to bust your budget on swanky items. The house should appeal to the masses because you want to get prospective buyers interested. Also, it’s important to allocate a contingency fund before you begin your project. Scares and surprises will come up when you start renovating. Make sure you’re prepared for anything unexpected that comes your way.

Be Patient

It’s so important to be patient with yourself while flipping houses. It’s easy to become frustrated and overwhelmed while completing such a huge project. However, try not to let the stress get to you; remember that you’re doing this for a reason. Hopefully, you’ll make tons of cash and it’ll all be worth it the end.

Keep all these tips in mind while you’re searching for the perfect fixer-upper. Ask your realtor if they have any insights, as well. They’ve likely dealt with clients in similar situations. If things go well and you do make a pretty penny flipping a house, perhaps you can take on two at a time. Before you know it, you’ll have your own house-flipping show.

The post 3 Must-Read Tips for Flipping Houses appeared first on RealtyBizNews: Real Estate News.

How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.

BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS REAL ESTATE ADDS PRESENCE IN SOUTHERN NEW MEXICO WITH AFFILIATION OF STEINBORN & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS REAL ESTATE ADDS PRESENCE IN SOUTHERN  NEW MEXICO WITH AFFILIATION OF STEINBORN & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE

https://realtybiznews.com/better-homes-and-gardens-real-estate-adds-presence-in-southern-new-mexico-with-affiliation-of-steinborn-associates-real-estate/98757887/

Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC ,  a Realogy (NYSE: RLGY) brand, announced today that Steinborn & Associates Real Estate, a company that has been a community leader for over 50 years, has affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens® Real Estate.  Now  known as Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Steinborn & Associates, the firm is headquartered in Las Cruces, NM. 

The company is led by co-owners Amy and John
Hummer, who acquired the firm in 2006.  In
2019, the company generated approximately 1,300 transactions equating to $244
million in sales volume prior to its affiliation, ranking it number one in
overall production among all real estate companies in Southern New Mexico.

With three offices and 100 affiliated agents, Better Homes and
Gardens Real Estate Steinborn & Associates serves the greater Las Cruces
region, including the village of Mesilla and Santa Teresa, NM. Steinborn
Property Management and Steinborn TCN Commercial Real Estate will continue to
do business under their current names and are not part of this affiliation.

Home
to New Mexico State University, White Sands Missile Range and thriving healthcare
and agricultural industries, the area has received national and international
attention via Spaceport America, the nation’s first purpose built commercial
spaceport and home to Virgin Galactic.  The
region, a popular destination for first-time homebuyers, families and retirees
alike, has become a “bedroom” community to the adjacent and booming economy of
El Paso.

Details:

Better
Homes and Gardens Real Estate Steinborn & Associates will be joining the Cartus
Broker Network, a global relocation company.  Cartus works with a
worldwide client base serving corporate, government, and membership
organizations with an expansive global footprint providing services into
and out of more than 185 countries.The
company is excited to participate in Realogy’s affinity referral programs
with Navy Federal Credit Union and Realogy Military Rewards as well as new
programs under development.on the boards of Mesilla Valley Hospice,
the Junior League of Las Cruces, March of Dimes, New Mexico State College of
Education Advisory, and the New Mexico Association of REALTORS®. 
Amy is a past Citizen of the Year Award recipient and REALTOR® of the Year by the Las Cruces
Association of REALTORS®.
Most recently, John co-founded the Burrell College of Osteopathic
Medicine.  He is also a managing partner
of several real estate development companies with multi-family, office, retail
and medical related projects. He is past chairman of the Greater Las Cruces
Chamber of Commerce and Mesilla Valley Economic Development Alliance.  He is currently an executive board member of
The Borderplex Alliance, the economic development entity for El Paso, TX, Las
Cruces, NM and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

Quotes:

“Amy and John Hummer have both leveraged
their highly successful careers in healthcare and banking to achieve success
leading a brokerage  and have contributed
to Steinborn’s continued market leading position in Las Cruces. Along with
their management team, they are the ideal leaders to join with us and grow the
brand in this exciting area.  They have
been a vital part of the region’s business community for the past twenty years.
They recognize that affiliating with Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate uniquely
positions them to expand their service area, welcome top talent to their team,
and invest in their current agents with greater resources. Their consistent
ranking as a market-leader is a testament to their vision, culture, and
business development goals.  I couldn’t
be prouder to work together with them to grow their well-respected company in
this lifestyle-driven market.”

-Sherry Chris, President & CEO, Better Homes and
Gardens® Real Estate

“We are proud of our market-leading
position and deep connection to our community. We knew that the best way to further
enrich the home buying and selling experience of our clients and increase our
impact on our community was to tap into a sophisticated and powerful platform. Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate’s robust suite of tools and
technology are enhanced by the power of one of the most recognized lifestyle
brands – Better Homes and Gardens.  Joining
the Cartus Broker Network, along with participating in Realogy’s current and
future affinity programs, will yield tremendous benefits to both our team of
professional REALTORS and clients. John and I, along with Qualifying Broker
Connie Hettinga, intend to leverage all these opportunities with a renewed
commitment to high performance and growth.”

-Amy
Hummer, Broker/Co-owner, Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Steinborn
& Associates

About Better Homes and Gardens Real
Estate LLC

Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC is a dynamic real estate brand that offers a full range of services to brokers, sales associates and home buyers and sellers. Using innovative technology, sophisticated business systems and the broad appeal of a lifestyle brand, Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC embodies the future of the real estate industry while remaining grounded in the tradition of home. Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC is a subsidiary of Realogy Holdings Corp. (NYSE: RLGY), a global leader in real estate franchising and provider of real estate brokerage, relocation and settlement services. 

The growing Better Homes and Gardens® Real Estate network includes nearly 13,000 independent sales associates and more than 370 offices serving home buyers and sellers across the United States, Canada, Jamaica, The Bahamas and Australia. 

Better Homes & Gardens® is a registered trademark of Meredith
Corporation licensed to Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC and used with
permission. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each
Better Homes and Gardens® Real Estate Franchise is independently owned and
operated. 

The post BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS REAL ESTATE ADDS PRESENCE IN SOUTHERN NEW MEXICO WITH AFFILIATION OF STEINBORN & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE appeared first on RealtyBizNews: Real Estate News.

anyone love real estate as much as me

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

anyone  love real estate as much as me

8 Tips To Make Your Listing Picture Perfect

Buyers get their first impression of a home from property photos, so stage for the shoot.

How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.

How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.

who else loves real estate ?

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

Real estate sold at a price of $100,000 would have a transfer fee of $300. Feb. 24. Luis F. and Michelle L. Silva to Connie L. Corrao and Agapito …

How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.

U.S. credit scores reach record high in 2019

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://realtybiznews.com/u-s-credit-scores-reach-record-high-in-2019/98757836/

Credit scores in the U.S. are improving, especially among millennials, according to a new analysis by the credit rating agency Experian.

The
analysis shows that the average FICO score in the U.S. hit a record
high of 703 in 2019, while the share of Americans with a score of
over 700 hit 59%, the highest level since records began.

“Millennials ages 24 to 39 now outnumber baby boomers and are finally hitting their credit stride,” the Experian report notes. “Their economic emergence is reflected by a 25-point increase in their average FICO score since 2012—the biggest increase of any generation.”

The
report states that a FICO score of above 700 is considered to be a
“marker of good credit” by most lenders. As such, most borrowers
would be eligible for the best mortgage rates if they have such a
score.

The
percentage of Americans with a maximum possible FICO score of 850 has
increased 63% in the past decade, according to the report. Around
1.2% of Americans have a perfect FICO score of 850.

“Americans are making better credit decisions,” Shannon Lois, Experian’s head of analytics, consulting, and operations, told HousingWire. “Which is an indication of consumers being more educated about their credit.”

FICO
scores range from 300 (considered “very poor”) to 850 (considered
“excellent”).

The five states with the highest credit scores were Minnesota (average FICO score 733), North Dakota (727), South Dakota (727), Vermont (726) and Wisconsin (725). Elsewhere, the states with the lowest average credit scores were Mississippi (667) and Louisiana (677), CNBC reported.

The post U.S. credit scores reach record high in 2019 appeared first on RealtyBizNews: Real Estate News.

How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home

  Posted in Residential on

  by admin

https://www.redfin.com/blog/introducing-your-dog-to-a-new-home/

Moving to a new home ranks right up there among life’s super-stressful events. This also holds true for your dog. New rooms, unfamiliar smells, a new yard, and a neighborhood of new people and pets. introducing your dog to a new home can all be very exciting — but also overwhelming. While you may have the option of chilling out with a glass of red wine or venting to a friend about your stress, your beloved dog, unfortunately, doesn’t have those options.

Here are some tips for introducing your dog to a new home:

Pack up gradually

Try your best to remain calm during the weeks that you’re packing up your home. From gathering packing materials to organizing your moving boxes, there are tons of things to get done. If you’re super-stressed your dog will pick up on your emotions and feel uneasy as well. If you can stay organized and collected and pack up over time, your dog will feel more at ease during this transition.  

Find a new vet 

Your hometown vet may have recommendations for an alternative in your new town. Or, if you’re relocating to a new city, like New York, for work, check with your new employer. Their HR department may have referral services. If your chosen vet’s office isn’t open 24/7, also find an emergency vet in your new area who’s available at all hours. Add the vet’s phone number and address to your phone, and learn how to find your way there. 

Get new collar tags before you move

You should also get a new ID tag for your dog, and put it on before you move; many dogs get anxious and may try to run away in the first days in a new home. With many new smells and sounds, if your dog does run away during the first few days at your new home they may have less of an idea of where to come back to, which is why having these news tags is so important. 

Check the house for pet hazards

Before you move in, carefully scan the house for potential pet hazards. Look high and low. Stoop down to your dog’s level to look for hazards on the floor, and also look to levels where your dog may be able to climb or jump. Even if your dog isn’t a climber, a new environment may cause stress and lead to unusual behavior.

Be especially careful to look for:

Possible poisons: Household cleaners, antifreeze, paint, pesticides, medications (prescription and over-the-counter, including vitamins), and houseplants. Medications are by far the leading cause of calls to the Animal Poison Control Center.
Choking hazards: Give your house a clean sweep before moving in and look for buttons, needles, Legos and other tiny toys or game pieces that may have been left on the floor. Make sure window blinds and shades are well out of reach.
Electrical or heat sources: Small appliances, furnaces, fireplaces, and electrical cords.
Escape routes: Make sure fences and gates are closed and look for loose or missing window screens.

Make the introduction fun

If at all possible, place your dog’s bed and toys, as well as their water and food dishes, in your new home before arriving. This will let the dog know that this is their space now and it will be comforting to have familiar items and smells. When you first arrive with your dog after moving to your new home, take them to the backyard to relieve themself in the area you prefer. Showing your dog where the proper place to use the bathroom is located. Next, walk through the house and let your dog sniff around to their heart’s content. Try not to leave them alone during the first day in the new home, they may be nervous and you are what they are most familiar with. 

Keep old routines consistent 

Make each day’s routine consistent. Many people want to get all new stuff after a move, but it is advised to use your dog’s familiar leash, dog dish, food, and bed to help them feel more at home. Also, keep the rules the same. Don’t change the rules just because you feel bad that your dog is having to adjust to your new home. The more secure your dog feels, the smoother the transition will be. If your dog is anxious, using a crate can be a good option to help minimize anxiety.

Be patient 

Be patient and let your dog adjust on his or her own time. Some dogs will be perfectly comfortable within a few days, but others may take a few weeks or months to finally feel at home and settle in. No matter how long it takes your dog to adjust, your patience is more likely to speed up the process and make your dog feel more comfortable.

Bring your dog along to meet your neighbors

When you begin to explore the new neighborhood and meet your neighbors you should bring your dog with you. They’ll begin to familiarize themselves with the new area and smells as well as what the surrounding area of your home is like. You can also find out which neighbors have friendly dogs that may want to meet yours. And, if your dogs hit it off, book a date for the nearest dog park! 

Watch for territorial or unexpected behavior

After introducing your dog to your new home, some dogs may bark incessantly, become destructive, or become extra protective over you and your family. It is important to get these new behaviors figured out sooner rather than later. Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinarian for advice, or even a trainer or dog behaviorist if needed. 

Shower your dog with love

As hectic as the move is, be sure to take the time to shower your dog with lots and lots of extra love and attention. Spending some quality one-on-one time will help make you both feel better, and show your dog that this new home is a happy and safe place.

The post How to Introduce a Dog to a New Home appeared first on Redfin Blog.